Documentary  Commissioned by BBC Television and broadcast on BBC 2, BBC World and BBC Persian

DURATION: 50 MINUTES

Musician and film maker Roxana Vilk grew up in Tehran. Her parents fled Iran in the wake of the Iranian Revolution in 1979 and since the breakdown of diplomatic relations between London and Tehran, she has been unable to return. In this film Roxana explores her identity as a British-Iranian, and finds out how to teach her children about a country they have never visited. From a tower block in Glasgow, to the glamour of Los Angeles, home to the largest group of Iranians living abroad, she finds out how other Iranian migrants keep their culture alive. While some of the questions she raises are specific to the Iranian diaspora, this film speaks to broader issues of identity faced by immigrants the world over.

Haven’t you been looking for a film that beautifully captures the experiences and emotions of so many 1.5 and 2nd generation Iranians in diaspora? And weren’t you also hoping that it featured fresh new artists, crossed multiple diaspora communities, and yet remained touchingly personal? It’s finally here. The super talented British-Iranian filmmaker Roxana Vilk gives us Iranian Enough?, airing this weekend on BBC World
— Fesenjoon Magazine US

 

 

 

Iranian Enough?  50 minute BBC Documentary

Presented by Roxana Vilk 

Directed by Harriet Shawcross

Produced by Jane Taylor 

Produced by BBC Persian & BBC Word

New  BBC documentary  film : to be broadcast in February 2014 on BBC Scotland and available on BBC iplayer shortly after. 

Previously broadcast on BBC World and BBC Persian 

DURATION: 50 MINUTES

Musician and film maker Roxana Vilk grew up in Tehran. Her parents fled Iran in the wake of the Iranian Revolution in 1979 and since the breakdown of diplomatic relations between London and Tehran, she has been unable to return. In this film Roxana explores her identity as a British-Iranian, and finds out how to teach her children about a country they have never visited. From a tower block in Glasgow, to the glamour of Los Angeles, home to the largest group of Iranians living abroad, she finds out how other Iranian migrants keep their culture alive. While some of the questions she raises are specific to the Iranian diaspora, this film speaks to broader issues of identity faced by immigrants the world over.