LULLABIES FLYER

“Lullabies” celebrates the diversity of cultures that have come to call Bristol home.

Through both my Ignite Artist Residency at Trinity Arts Centre Bristol, and Research and Development funding from Arts Council England, I am collecting and recording lullabies from the diverse communities across Bristol as the starting point for a new cross art, community led piece of work.

The sharing of these lullabies leads also to the sharing of the stories behind the songs and the various stories of heritage and migration to this city. For the research and development stage of this ‘Lullabies’ piece I have a the support and creative input of a great team, Creative Producer Katy Noakes, Designer Ruth Ramsey, Dramaturg, Edson Burton and Sound Designer Peter Vilk

Inspiration behind the project

At night, I like to imagine all the songs in different languages being sung by parents in Bristol, to help send their children to sleep.

I have been singing Iranian songs to my boys as lullabies, since they were babies, and it is the one moment of the day when I feel this strong invisible thread connecting me back to my motherland and passing that heritage on to my children. It is also in that magical moment that my kids might ask me about their grandparents, or about the landscapes and culture of a country they have never been able to visit.

After speaking to others who are of mixed heritage, and face a similar challenge of how to keep our mother tongues and cultures alive I realised there was scope to dive deeper into this subject but through music, as music has no borders, can touch us all and unites us rather than divides us.

The project is currently in its research and development stage please send an email to roxanavilk@gmail.com with any enquiries and questions.

The Story of the Creative Process so far…

I have started recording lullabies, songs and interviews. Here are some extracts of the lullabies so far and some images from the creative collecting process.







 
Sharing lullabies is deep and private because you end up talking about your past, your motherhood, your mothering and your mother.
— Taban - Kurdistan
I’ve singing Iranian songs to my boys as lullabies, since they were babies, and it is the one moment of the day when I feel this strong invisible thread connecting me back to my motherland and passing that heritage on to my children.
— Roxana Vilk
From the very first moment Bristol felt like home, I love the green parks, the hills, I love the streets, the people, there are so many different cultures, in Hungary the society is quite homogeneous you can’t meet other cultures
— Kati
 
Hearing Kati and Emeshe telling the story of their journey from Hungary to Bristol.

Hearing Kati and Emeshe telling the story of their journey from Hungary to Bristol.

Mariam sharing a lullaby from Somalia

Mariam sharing a lullaby from Somalia

Taban and Roxana sharing stories over pistachios and tea

Taban and Roxana sharing stories over pistachios and tea

Kurdish Actress Taban in rehearsal at Trinity Centre

Kurdish Actress Taban in rehearsal at Trinity Centre

Adelaide sharing the lullaby from Portugal

Adelaide sharing the lullaby from Portugal